What to do if you become ill?

Many restaurants are not following the requirements set forth by Health Canada and enforced by MAPAQ (in Quebec). Therefore if you’ve become ill at a restaurant that has made a GF claim, you are encouraged to file a complaint contact with MAPAQ at: 1-800-463-5023 The Canadian Celiac Association (CCA) and the Fondation Québécoise de la maladie cœliaque (FQMC) endorses the Gluten Free Food Program (GFFP). The Gluten Free Food Program helps restaurants meet gluten-free regulatory requirements and arms them with the knowledge, systems and training needed to keep their gluten-free customers safe.

Please support this program by frequenting food service establishments that have applied for this certification and help spread the word…. We have the wright to safe food and to not be mislead!


Rules restaurants must follow...

According to MAPAQ (le Ministère de l’agriculture et de pêcherie du Québec) the government body responsible for food safety and restaurant inspections in Quebec has confirmed that Restaurants making gluten-free claims on their menus must have procedures in place to avoid all cross contamination; having a disclaimer on their menu that indicates the possibility of cross-contamination, or a disclaimer voiding any liability of cross-contamination while indicating that an item is GF is considered contradictory to Health Canada’s labelling regulations. A gluten-free claim is any representation in labelling or advertising that states, suggests or implies that a food is free of gluten. In order for a food to be represented as "gluten-free", it must comply with section B.24.018 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR). Claims to the effect that a food does not contain an ingredient or substance must be factual and not misleading.


Governemnt Regulations

Section B.24.018 of the FDR prohibits the labelling, packaging, advertising or sale of a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is a gluten-free food if the food contains any gluten protein or modified gluten protein, including any gluten protein fraction, from wheat, oats, barley, rye, triticale or their hybridized strains. Division 24 of the Food and Drug Regulations (FDR) sets out specific regulations that apply to "Foods for Special Dietary Use".

A "food for special dietary use" is defined in B.24.001 of the FDR as a food that has been specially processed or formulated to meet the particular requirements of a person: a. in whom a physical or physiological condition exists as a result of a disease, disorder or injury; or b. for whom a particular effect, including but not limited to weight loss, is to be obtained by a controlled intake of foods.

As per section B.24.003(1)(g), a gluten-free food that meets the requirements described in section B.24.018, is one of the types of foods for special dietary use that are covered by the requirements of Division 24.

As of August 4, 2012, section B.24.018 of the Food and Drug Regulations will state that:

It is prohibited to label, package, sell or advertise a food in a manner likely to create an impression that it is a gluten-free food if the food contains any gluten protein or modified gluten protein, including any gluten protein fraction,referred to in the definition "gluten" in subsection B.01.010.1(1). http://www.inspection.gc.ca/food/labelling/food-labelling-for-industry/allergens-and-gluten/gluten-free-claims/eng/1340194596012/1340194681961